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Of course, any information pertaining to taxes is complex, full of exceptions, and subject to change. This discussion deals with the general rules for taxation of annuities–you should consult a tax advisor for more specific information before you take any action.
An individual retirement arrangement (IRA) is a personal savings plan that offers specific tax benefits.
If you’re in a high deductible health plan, a health savings account (HSA) is a way to accumulate money tax-free to pay these deductibles and other medical costs. In this video, learn the benefits of leveraging an HSA, not only to pay your medical expenses but also as a way to save for retirement.
Social Security benefits are a major source of retirement income for most people. Your Social Security retirement benefit is based on the number of years you’ve worked and the amount you’ve earned. When you begin taking Social Security benefits also greatly affects the size of your benefit.
Medicare won’t cover all of your healthcare costs during retirement, so you may want to buy a supplemental medical insurance policy known as Medigap. Offered by private insurance companies, Medigap policies are designed to cover costs not paid by Original Medicare, helping you fill the gaps in your Medicare coverage.
Medicare is a federal program that provides health insurance to retired individuals, regardless of their medical condition, and certain younger people with disabilities or end-stage renal disease.
At some point, many of us will need to take on responsibility for an aging loved one. And when that time comes, there is an enormous amount of pressure to consider all factors and make the best decisions regarding his or her health and finances. Where will your mother, father, wife, or husband receive the highest-quality care? Where will he or she be treated like a resident, not just a patient? Where is the cleanest skilled nursing facility with the best food? Where will your loved one feel safe?
Each spring, a rite of passage occurs in stadiums, auditoriums, and Zoom calls across the nation: The latest graduates cross the stage to begin a new phase of financial independence. As has always been the case for graduates, the class of 2021 will face an array of financial choices for the first time—simple decisions on saving and spending that may seem small in the moment but have financial repercussions that can extend far into the future.
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