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A beneficiary is the person or entity you name (i.e., designate) to receive the death benefits of a life insurance policy. Some states require that your beneficiary have an insurable interest in your life or be related to you (at least at the time the contract is initiated), while others have no such restriction
ou know how important it is to plan for your retirement, but where do you begin? One of your first steps should be to estimate how much income you’ll need to fund your retirement. That’s not as easy as it sounds, because retirement planning is not an exact science. Your specific needs depend on your goals and many other factors.
To illustrate how life insurance can help you plan your estate wisely, let’s compare what happened upon the death of two friends: Frank, who bought life insurance, and Dave, who did not. (Please note that these illustrations are hypothetical.)
Emily and Brad are a married couple in their late 40s with a couple of teenage children.
After you retire, you’ll probably focus more on your health than ever before.
Whether you’ve had a long-term care insurance (LTCI) policy for years or you’re thinking of buying one, it’s critical to understand exactly what set of conditions will trigger coverage.
A trust is a legal entity that holds assets for the benefit of another.
These days, it’s not unusual to hear of $2 million, $10 million, and even $20 million court judgments against individuals. If someone is injured in your home, or if you cause a serious auto accident, you could have to pay such a judgment. If you don’t have an umbrella liability policy at the time of the accident, anything above the limits of your homeowners, renters, or auto insurance policy will have to come out of your pocket.
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