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Your adult child plans to borrow $400,000 to buy a home. You want to help. You could provide that sum in the form of a gift, but that would trigger federal gift-tax complications. Besides, giving away that much might leave you a little uneasy—and take a bite out of your portfolio. Instead, consider providing the money as a loan—an intra-family loan.
The turn of the 20th century was a time of high optimism and enthusiasm for the future. This Age of Hope was fueled by technological innovations such as mass communication, mass mobility—with the advent of affordable personal automobiles—and the extension of education to nearly everyone.
The Internal Revenue Service announced its annual update to dollar limitations for pension and other retirement plans for tax year 2021.
Conventional wisdom says that what goes up must come down. But even if you view market volatility as a normal occurrence, it can be tough to handle when it’s your money at stake.
Do you ever wonder where your money goes each month? Does it seem like you’re never able to get ahead? If so, you may want to establish a budget to help you keep track of how you spend your money and help you reach your financial goals.
Health expenses are rising faster than inflation, and even insured workers are finding it harder to pay their portion from year to year (premiums, copays, coinsurance, and deductibles), much less plan for the future. The stakes are even higher for early retirees (younger than 65) and self-employed individuals who must purchase their own health insurance and bear the entire cost themselves.
If you give away money or property during your life, those transfers may be subject to federal gift and estate tax and perhaps state gift tax. The money and property you own when you die (i.e., your estate) may also be subject to federal gift and estate tax, and some form of state death tax. These property transfers may also be subject to generation-skipping transfer taxes. You should understand all of these taxes, especially since the passage of the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (the 2001 Tax Act); the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010 (the 2010 Tax Act); the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (the 2012 Tax Act); and the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The recent Tax Acts contain several changes that make estate planning much easier.
It’s difficult to imagine functioning in today’s world without credit. Whether we’re buying a car or purchasing a home, credit has become an integral part of our everyday lives. Having easy access to credit goes hand in hand with having a good credit score, so it’s important to know how to maintain a positive credit score and credit history.
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