Read on to learn more about the relationship between risk and reward, how to understand your own tolerance for risk, ways to reduce risk through diversification, and where you can look to find reputable sources of information about investments.

If you give away money or property during your life, those transfers may be subject to federal gift and estate tax and perhaps state gift tax. The money and property you own when you die (i.e., your estate) may also be subject to federal gift and estate tax, and some form of state death tax. These property transfers may also be subject to generation-skipping transfer taxes. You should understand all of these taxes, especially since the passage of the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (the 2001 Tax Act); the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010 (the 2010 Tax Act); the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (the 2012 Tax Act); and the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The recent Tax Acts contain several changes that make estate planning much easier.

In tax lingo, your principal residence is the place where you legally reside. It’s typically the place where you spend most of your time, but several other factors are also relevant in determining your principal residence. Many of the tax benefits associated with home ownership apply mainly to your principal residence—different rules apply to second homes and investment properties. Here’s what you need to know to make owning a home really pay off at tax time.

There’s no denying the benefits of a college education: the ability to compete in today’s job market, increased earning power, and expanded horizons. But these advantages come at a price. And yet, year after year, thousands of students graduate from college. So, how do they do it?

Social Security was originally intended to provide older Americans with continuing income after retirement. Today, though the scope of Social Security has been widened to include survivor, disability, and other benefits, retirement benefits are still the cornerstone of the program.

Conventional wisdom says that what goes up must come down. But even if you view market volatility as a normal occurrence, it can be tough to handle when it’s your money at stake.

If you have a 401(k) plan at work and need some cash, you might be tempted to borrow or withdraw money from it. But keep in mind that the purpose of a 401(k) is to save for retirement. Take money out of it now, and you’ll risk running out of money during retirement. You may also face stiff tax consequences and penalties for withdrawing money before age 59½. Still, if you’re facing a financial emergency—for instance, your child’s college tuition is almost due and your 401(k) is your only source of available funds—borrowing or withdrawing money from your 401(k) may be your only option.

This webinar is a comprehensive discussion around planning for retirement. We will discuss Social Security benefits, healthcare planning with Medicare, creating income in retirement, and asset allocation strategies.

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